About a month ago I wrote about how cool was to migrate to HHVM on OpenShift. Custom cartridge for Nginx + HHVM and MariaDB was running fast and I was really excited about the new stack. I was landing on a new, beautiful world.

About a week later I faced some problems because of disk space. Files took only 560MB over 1GB but OpenShift shell gave me an error for 100% disk usage (and a nice blank page on the home because cache couldn’t be written). I wasn’t able to understand why it was giving me that error. It probably depends on log files written by custom cartridge in other position inside of the filesystem. No idea. Anyway I had no time to go deeper so I bought 1 more GB of storage.

The day after I bought the storage blog speed goes down. It was almost impossible to open the blog and CloudFlare gives me timeout for half of the requests. Blog visits started to fall and I have no idea about how to fix that. Some weeks later I discover some troubles with My Corderwall Badges and Simple Sharer Button Adder but, in the OpenShift environment, I had no external caching system useful to handle this kind of problems.

I didn’t want to come back to MySQL and Apache but also trash all my articles wasn’t fun so I choose something I rejected 3 years ago: I took a standalone server.

server-in-datacenter

First choice was Scaleway. It’s trendy and is BareMetal. 3.5€ for a 4 core ARM (very hipster choice), 2 GB RAM, 50 GB SSD server. New interface is cool, better then Linode and Digital Ocean, server and resources are managed easily. Unfortunately HHVM is still experimental on ARM and SSD are on SAN, and they aren’t so fast (100MB/s).

Next choice was OVH. New 2016 VPS SSD (available in Canadian datacenters) are cheap enough (3.5$) and offer a virtual core Xeon with 2 GB RAM and 10 GB SSD. Multicore performances are lower and you have a lot of less storage but is an X86-64 architecture and SSD is faster (250 MB/s). I took this one!

Unfortunately my preferences aren’t changed since my first post. I’m still a developer, not a sysadmin. I’m not a master in Linux configuration and my stack has several running parts and my blog was still unavailable. My beautiful migration on cutting edge technologies became an emergency landing.

Luckily I found several online tutorial which explain how to master the WordPress stack. In the next days I completed the migration and my new stack now runs on: Pound, Varnish, Nginx, HHVM, PHP-FPM and MariaDB. I hope to have enough time in the coming days to publish all the useful stuff I used for configuration.

For the moment I’m proud to share average response time of the home page: 342ms 🙂

infrastructure-update

Everything started on Heroku in October 2012 over their dynos with Heroku Postgres and continued on OpenShift in August 2013 over a LAMP stack based on Apache 2.4, PHP 5.3 and MySQL 5.1.

Now it’s time to to move my little blog on a modern stack. Best offer on OpenShift is a variation of the standard LEMP (we can call it: LEMP-HH) stack with HHVM 3.8, MariaDB 5.5 over NGINX 1.7.

lemphh-stack

Actually biggest performances improvement was achieved adding a good cache plugin a few months ago. I always used W3 Total Cache and WP Super Cache but, in this specific case, they are both complex to use because of the structure of OpenShift stack. Best solution I found is WP Fastest Cache plugin, one of the latest cache plugin I tested. Here is the stunning header of their website showing two beautiful cheetahs (are they cheetahs?).

wp-fastes-cache

Anyway coming back on new stack, there is no official bundle yet but you can create a new application using tengyifei’s HHVM 3.8 cartridge and adding OpenShift MariaDB 5.5 cartridge. I wasn’t able to run them on different gears (with scaling option activated and HAProxy) but seems fast enough on a single gear.

Filesystem structure is similar to the standard PHP bundle except for the application dir that is named www/ instead of php/. I used last backup from UpdraftPlus to migrate database on MariaDB. On non scalable applications you need to forward port in order to access DB from your local machine. RHC command is:

rhc port-forward -a application-name

Source here: Getting Started with Port Forwarding on OpenShift

Moving on NGINX also causes problems on permalinks because .htaccess doesn’t work anymore. The Nginx Helper plugin fix the problem but you could simply add a couple of row to NGINX configuration located in /config/nginx.d/default.conf.erb.

# Handle any other URI
location / {
try_files $uri $uri/ /index.php?q=$request_uri;
}

Discussion on WordPress support forum: WordPress Permalinks on NGINX

Refactor of previous filesystem, migration of database and bugfix of permalinks and other stuff takes about 2 hours and, at the end, everything seems working fine. I’m quite confident this a future proof solution but I’m going to test it until next major update 🙂

[UPDATE 2015-09-06 21:56 CEST]

After migration sitemap_index.xml and robots.txt weren’t reachable. Some rules were missing. I took the opportunity to switch to Yoast SEO for sitemap, Facebook open graph and Twitter cards. Then, these rules fix problems with SEO.

# Rewrites for WordPress SEO XML Sitemap
rewrite ^/sitemap_index.xml$ /index.php?sitemap=1 last;
rewrite ^/([^/]+?)-sitemap([0-9]+)?.xml$ /index.php?sitemap=$1&sitemap_n=$2 last;
# Rewrites for robots.txt
rewrite ^/robots\.txt$ /index.php?robots=1 last;

I always like The Setup. Discover what kind of technologies, hardware and softwares other skilled people are using is extremely useful and really fun for me. This time I’d like to share some tips from the complete reboot I did to my personal ecosystem after switch to my new Macbook.

macbook_pro_13_retina

From the hardware side is a simple high-end 2015 Macbook Pro 13″ Retina with Intel Core i7 Haswell dual-core at 3,4GHz, 16GB of RAM and 1TB of SSD PCI Express 3.0. Is fast, solid, lightweight and flexible. The only required accessory is the Be.eZ LArobe Second Skin.

From the software side I decided to avoid Time Machine restore in order to setup a completely new environment. I started on a OS X 10.10 Yosemite fresh installation.

As polyglot developer I usually deal with a lot of different applications, programming languages and tools. In order to decide what top install, a list of what I had on the previous machine and what I need more was really useful.

Here is a list of useful software and some tips about the installation process.

Applications

paid_apps

Paid softwares worth having: Evernote (with Premium subscription and Skitch) and Todoist (with Premium subscription) both available on the Mac App Store. 1Password, Fantastical 2, OmniGraffle, Carbon Copy Cloner, Backblaze and Expandrive available on their own websites.

Free software worth having: Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox as browser, Apache OpenOffice, Skype and Slack as chat, VLC for multimedia and Transmission for torrents.

app_from_suites

Suites or part of: Adobe Photoshop CC, Adobe Illustrator CC and Adobe Acrobat Pro DC are part of the Adobe Creative Cloud. Microsoft Word 2016, and Microsoft Excel 2016 are part of Microsoft Office 2016 for Mac (now in free preview). Apple Pages, and Apple Keynote are preinstalled as Apple iWork suite as well as Apple Calendar and Apple Contacts.

Development tools

Utilities for Power Users: Caffeine, Growl and HardwareGrowler, iStat Menu Pro, Disk Inventory X, Tor Browser and TrueCrypt 7.1a (you need to fix a little installation bug on OS X 10.10), Kinematic and Boot2Docker for Docker, Sublime Text 3 (with some additions like: Spacegray Theme, Soda Theme, a new icon, Source Code Pro font), Tower, Visual Studio Code, Android SDK (for Android emulator) and XCode (for iOS emulator), VirtualBox (with some useful Linux virtual images), iTerm 2.

CLI: OhMyZSH, Homebrew, GPG (installed using brew), XCode Command Line Tools (from Apple Developers website), Git (with git-flow installed using brew), AWS CLI (install via pip), PhantomJS, s3cmd and faster s4cmd, Heroku toolbelt and Openshift Client Tools (install via gem).

daemons

Servers: MariaDB 10.0 (brew), MongoDB 3.0 (brew), Redis 3.0 (brew), Elasticsearch 1.6 (brew), Nginx 1.8.0 (brew), PostgreSQL 9.4.2 (via Postgres.app), Hadoop 2.7.0 (brew), Spark 1.4 (download from official website), Neo4j 2.2 (brew), Accumulo 1.7.0 (download from official website), Crate 0.49 (download from official website), Mesos 0.22 (download from official website), Riak 2.1.1 (brew), Storm 0.9.5 (download from official website), Zookeeper 3.4.6 (brew), Sphinx 2.2 (brew), Cassandra 2.1.5 (brew).

languages

Programming languages: RVM, Ruby (MRI 2.2, 2.1, 2.0, 1.9.3, 1.8.7, REE 2012.02, JRuby 1.7.19 installed using RVM), PHP 5.6 with PHP-FPM (installed using brew), HHVM 3.7.2 (installed using brew with adding additional repo, has some issues on 10.10), Python 2.7 (brew python) and Python 3.4 (brew python3), Pip 7.1 (shipped with Python), NVM, Node.js 0.12 and IO.js 2.3 (both installed using NVM), Go 1.4.2 (from Golang website), Java 8 JVM (from Oracle website), Java 8 SE JDK (from Oracle website), Scala 2.11 (from Scala website), Clojure 1.6 (from Clojure website), Erlang 17.0 (brew), Haskell GHC 7.10 (brew), Haskell Cabal 1.22 (brew), OCaml 4.02.1 (brew), R 3.2.1 (from R for Mac OS X website), .NET Core and ASP.NET (brew using DNVM), GPU Ocelot (compiled with a lot of libraries).

Full reboot takes about 2 days. Some software are still missing but I was able to restart my work almost completely. I hope this list would be helpful for anyone 🙂