It’s about half an year I want to move my blog away from Heroku. It’s the best PaaS I ever used but the free plan has a huge limit: the dynos idle. In a previous post i talked about how to use Heroku to build a reverse proxy in front of AppFog to avoid theirs custom domain limit but the idle problem is still there. My blog has less than 100 visits per day and almost every visitor has to wait 5-10 seconds to view home page because dynos are always idle.

openshift_logoToday I decided to move to another platform suggested by my friend @dani_viga: OpenShift. It’s a PaaS similar to Heroku which use Git to control revision and has a similar scaling system. And the free plan hasn’t the idle problem and it’s 10 times faster!

I created a new application using the following cartridge: PHP 5.3, MySQL 5.1 (I’d like to use MariaDB but cartridge is still in development and I couldn’t install it) and phpMyAdmin 3.4. They require a Git repo to setup application and provide a WordPress template to start. I used it as template moving code of my blog into /php directory.

The hard part was to migrate my PostgreSQL database into the new MySQL. To start I removed PG4WP plugin following installation instruction in reverse order.

Then I exported my PostgreSQL database using heroku db:pull command. It’s based on taps and is really useful. I had some problems with my local installation of MySQL because taps has no options about packet size and character set so you must set them as default. I added a few line to my.cnf configuration:

# enlarged, before was 1M
max_allowed_packet = 10M
# default to utf-8
skip-character-set-client-handshake
character_set_client=utf8
character_set_server=utf8

At the end of the pull my local database contains a exact copy of the Heroku one and I can dump to a SQL file and import into the new MySQL cartridge using phpMyAdmin.

The only problem I had was about SSL certificate. The free plan doesn’t offer SSL certificate for custom domain so I have to remove the use of HTTPS for the login. You can do in the wp-config.php setting:

define('FORCE_SSL_ADMIN', false);

Now my blog runs on OpenShift and by now seems incredibly faster 😀