I always like The Setup. Discover what kind of technologies, hardware and softwares other skilled people are using is extremely useful and really fun for me. This time I’d like to share some tips from the complete reboot I did to my personal ecosystem after switch to my new Macbook.

macbook_pro_13_retina

From the hardware side is a simple high-end 2015 Macbook Pro 13″ Retina with Intel Core i7 Haswell dual-core at 3,4GHz, 16GB of RAM and 1TB of SSD PCI Express 3.0. Is fast, solid, lightweight and flexible. The only required accessory is the Be.eZ LArobe Second Skin.

From the software side I decided to avoid Time Machine restore in order to setup a completely new environment. I started on a OS X 10.10 Yosemite fresh installation.

As polyglot developer I usually deal with a lot of different applications, programming languages and tools. In order to decide what top install, a list of what I had on the previous machine and what I need more was really useful.

Here is a list of useful software and some tips about the installation process.

Applications

paid_apps

Paid softwares worth having: Evernote (with Premium subscription and Skitch) and Todoist (with Premium subscription) both available on the Mac App Store. 1Password, Fantastical 2, OmniGraffle, Carbon Copy Cloner, Backblaze and Expandrive available on their own websites.

Free software worth having: Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox as browser, Apache OpenOffice, Skype and Slack as chat, VLC for multimedia and Transmission for torrents.

app_from_suites

Suites or part of: Adobe Photoshop CC, Adobe Illustrator CC and Adobe Acrobat Pro DC are part of the Adobe Creative Cloud. Microsoft Word 2016, and Microsoft Excel 2016 are part of Microsoft Office 2016 for Mac (now in free preview). Apple Pages, and Apple Keynote are preinstalled as Apple iWork suite as well as Apple Calendar and Apple Contacts.

Development tools

Utilities for Power Users: Caffeine, Growl and HardwareGrowler, iStat Menu Pro, Disk Inventory X, Tor Browser and TrueCrypt 7.1a (you need to fix a little installation bug on OS X 10.10), Kinematic and Boot2Docker for Docker, Sublime Text 3 (with some additions like: Spacegray Theme, Soda Theme, a new icon, Source Code Pro font), Tower, Visual Studio Code, Android SDK (for Android emulator) and XCode (for iOS emulator), VirtualBox (with some useful Linux virtual images), iTerm 2.

CLI: OhMyZSH, Homebrew, GPG (installed using brew), XCode Command Line Tools (from Apple Developers website), Git (with git-flow installed using brew), AWS CLI (install via pip), PhantomJS, s3cmd and faster s4cmd, Heroku toolbelt and Openshift Client Tools (install via gem).

daemons

Servers: MariaDB 10.0 (brew), MongoDB 3.0 (brew), Redis 3.0 (brew), Elasticsearch 1.6 (brew), Nginx 1.8.0 (brew), PostgreSQL 9.4.2 (via Postgres.app), Hadoop 2.7.0 (brew), Spark 1.4 (download from official website), Neo4j 2.2 (brew), Accumulo 1.7.0 (download from official website), Crate 0.49 (download from official website), Mesos 0.22 (download from official website), Riak 2.1.1 (brew), Storm 0.9.5 (download from official website), Zookeeper 3.4.6 (brew), Sphinx 2.2 (brew), Cassandra 2.1.5 (brew).

languages

Programming languages: RVM, Ruby (MRI 2.2, 2.1, 2.0, 1.9.3, 1.8.7, REE 2012.02, JRuby 1.7.19 installed using RVM), PHP 5.6 with PHP-FPM (installed using brew), HHVM 3.7.2 (installed using brew with adding additional repo, has some issues on 10.10), Python 2.7 (brew python) and Python 3.4 (brew python3), Pip 7.1 (shipped with Python), NVM, Node.js 0.12 and IO.js 2.3 (both installed using NVM), Go 1.4.2 (from Golang website), Java 8 JVM (from Oracle website), Java 8 SE JDK (from Oracle website), Scala 2.11 (from Scala website), Clojure 1.6 (from Clojure website), Erlang 17.0 (brew), Haskell GHC 7.10 (brew), Haskell Cabal 1.22 (brew), OCaml 4.02.1 (brew), R 3.2.1 (from R for Mac OS X website), .NET Core and ASP.NET (brew using DNVM), GPU Ocelot (compiled with a lot of libraries).

Full reboot takes about 2 days. Some software are still missing but I was able to restart my work almost completely. I hope this list would be helpful for anyone 🙂

It’s about half an year I want to move my blog away from Heroku. It’s the best PaaS I ever used but the free plan has a huge limit: the dynos idle. In a previous post i talked about how to use Heroku to build a reverse proxy in front of AppFog to avoid theirs custom domain limit but the idle problem is still there. My blog has less than 100 visits per day and almost every visitor has to wait 5-10 seconds to view home page because dynos are always idle.

openshift_logoToday I decided to move to another platform suggested by my friend @dani_viga: OpenShift. It’s a PaaS similar to Heroku which use Git to control revision and has a similar scaling system. And the free plan hasn’t the idle problem and it’s 10 times faster!

I created a new application using the following cartridge: PHP 5.3, MySQL 5.1 (I’d like to use MariaDB but cartridge is still in development and I couldn’t install it) and phpMyAdmin 3.4. They require a Git repo to setup application and provide a WordPress template to start. I used it as template moving code of my blog into /php directory.

The hard part was to migrate my PostgreSQL database into the new MySQL. To start I removed PG4WP plugin following installation instruction in reverse order.

Then I exported my PostgreSQL database using heroku db:pull command. It’s based on taps and is really useful. I had some problems with my local installation of MySQL because taps has no options about packet size and character set so you must set them as default. I added a few line to my.cnf configuration:

# enlarged, before was 1M
max_allowed_packet = 10M
# default to utf-8
skip-character-set-client-handshake
character_set_client=utf8
character_set_server=utf8

At the end of the pull my local database contains a exact copy of the Heroku one and I can dump to a SQL file and import into the new MySQL cartridge using phpMyAdmin.

The only problem I had was about SSL certificate. The free plan doesn’t offer SSL certificate for custom domain so I have to remove the use of HTTPS for the login. You can do in the wp-config.php setting:

define('FORCE_SSL_ADMIN', false);

Now my blog runs on OpenShift and by now seems incredibly faster 😀

Serialized fields in Rails are a really useful feature to store structured data related to a single element of your application. Performance usually aren’t so stunning because they are stored in a text field.

Recently to overcome this limit hstore on PostgreSQL and similar structure on other DBMS have gained popularity.

Anyway editing data using a form still require a lot of code. Last week a was working on a form to edit options of an elements stored into serialized field and I found this question on StackOverflow. It seems a really interesting solution. For a serialized field called properties

class Element < ActiveRecord::Base
serialize :properties
end

I can dynamically define accessor method for any field I need.

class Element < ActiveRecord::Base
serialize :properties
def self.serialized_attr_accessor(*args)
args.each do |method_name|
eval "
def #{method_name}
(self.properties || {})[:#{method_name}]
end
def #{method_name}=(value)
self.properties ||= {}
self.properties[:#{method_name}] = value
end
attr_accessible :#{method_name}
"
end
end
serialized_attr_accessor :field1, :field2, :field3
end

And then you can easies access fields in a view

#haml
- form_for @element do |f|
= f.text_field :field1
= f.text_field :field2
= f.text_field :field3

IMHO it’s a really clean way to improve quality of accessor code.

Recently I needed to select best hosted service for some datastore to use for a large and complex project. Starting from Heroku and AppFog’s add-ons I found many free plans useful to test service and/or to use in production if your app is small enough (as example this blog runs on Heroku PostgreSQL’s Dev plan). Here the list:

MySQL

  • Xeround (Starter plan): 5 connection and 10 MB of storage
  • ClearDB (Ignite plan): 10 connections and 5 MB of storage

MongoDB

  • MongoHQ (Sandbox): 50MB of memory, 512MB of data
  • MongoLab (Starter plan): 496 MB of storage

Redis

  • RedisToGo (Nano plan): 5MB, 1 DB, 10 connections and no backups.
  • RedisCloud by Garantia Data: 20MB, 1 DB, 10 connections and no backups.
  • MyRedis (Gratis plan): 5MB, 1 DB, 3 connections and no backups.

Memcache

CouchDB

  • IrisCouch (up to 5$): No limits, usage fees for HTTP requests and storage.
  • Cloudant (Oxygen plan): 150,000 request, 250 MB of storage.

PostgreSQL – Heroku PostgreSQL (Dev plan): 20 connections, 10.000 rows of data
Cassandra – Cassandra.io (Beta on Heroku): 500 MB and 50 transactions per second
Riak – RiakOn! (Sandbox): 512MB of memory
Hadoop – Treasure Data (Nano plan): 100MB (compressed), data retention for 90 days
Neo4j – Heroku Neo4j (Heroku AddOn beta): 256MB of memory and 512MB of data.
OrientDB – NuvolaBase (Free): 100MB of storage and 100.000 records
TempoDB – TempoDB Hosted (Development plan): 50.000.000 data points, 50 series.
JustOneDB – Heroku JustOneDB (Lambda plan): 50MB of data